Port Charlotte, Florida 33948, United States

HEARTLAND OF THE CALUSA INDIANS

HEARTLAND OF THE CALUSA INDIANS

HEARTLAND OF THE CALUSA INDIANSHEARTLAND OF THE CALUSA INDIANS

HEARTLAND OF THE CALUSA INDIANS

HEARTLAND OF THE CALUSA INDIANS

HEARTLAND OF THE CALUSA INDIANSHEARTLAND OF THE CALUSA INDIANSHEARTLAND OF THE CALUSA INDIANS

Xenia Kyriakov

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Xenia Kyriakov

Welcome

We are sorry that due to the lack of a venue, we are not able to reschedule any events until one opens up. we look forward to seeing you soon. please know that as soon as is possible are wonderful presentations will resume.

Ted Ehmann 3/27/20

Xenia Kyriakov ,Postponed

The Bioarchaeology of medieval monasticism

Wintergarden Presbyterian Church will not be opened to our society for this event scheduled for March 19th. We are in the process of rescheduling Xenia. Please check back.


"Get thee to a nunnery"?

We will welcome FGCU visiting professor, forensic anthropologist Xenia Paula Kyriakou, to our March meeting, who will present a program on one of her research projects titled “Bioarchaeology of Monasticism: the Unruly Nuns of Cyprus.”  The presentation will cover the discovery of the human remains from the St. Theodore nunnery in Cyprus and contextualize the findings of the skeletal analysis within the socio-cultural context of medieval monasticism. Xenia Paula Kyriakou is a Greek-Cypriot forensic anthropologist and bioarchaeologist. She studied at the University of Malta for her undergraduate degree and continued her graduate education and professional development at the University of Edinburgh, Scotland.   

 

Bioarchaologist Xenia Paula Kyriakou 

She is currently a visiting instructor at Florida Gulf Coast University and is soon to complete her PhD at the University of Warsaw, Poland.   Xenia has worked in many countries both as a forensic expert dealing with the repatriation of those missing in armed conflict and as the bioarchaeologist on many archaeologist projects.  As a bioarchaeologist, Xenia has engaged in the study of different ancient and historic populations. She is currently working on a research project that addresses behavior and lifestyle within monastic and religious settings of Medieval Europe. 

  

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TED EHMANN. April 16, 6:30 pm awaiting venue

seeing red, unraveling the mystery of the englewood mound builders

  In 1934 archaeologist from the Smithsonian excavated mound and midden sites as part of the federal Works Project Administration. Many of these excavations were around Charlotte Harbor and Tampa Bay. It was the most coordinated and productive period for archaeological findings and research in Florida’s history. In almost all locations, no further research was done and the records forgotten. All the sites and their contents fit into prior knowledge of the Late Archaic and the Early Woodland Periods except one. The mysterious burial mound on Lemon Bay referred to as the Englewood Mound. The archaeologists of the time and to the present passed over two important findings that did not fit with the surrounding cultures, nor on the Florida peninsula. First, the ceramics found only there were so distinctive and of such finer quality, they were named Englewood and Lemon Bay. Second when they dug down to the primary burial, the burials were coved by a thick layer of red ochre. Ehmann concluded therefore that the people who built the burial mound on Lemon Bay were a distinctive and not a local culture at all. The presentation is about his journey to discover who were those mysterious people and where did they originate.

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RARE VIDEO INTERVIEW OF DR. EUGENIE CLARK

Steve Koski, archaeologist and president of the warm mineral springs/little salt spring archaeologic

 THURSDAY, May 21,  2020,  6:30 PM- WINTERGARDEN PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH


  

In the 1950s, Dr. Eugenie Clark put Cape Haze on the map, when she moved here with her family to study marine biology and shark behaviors at a laboratory set up by William and Anne Vanderbilt who just bought the area for a cattle ranch.

Dr. Clark who passed away on February 25, 2015 at the age of 92, was a world- famous ichthyologist. But few know of her work at the mineral springs as an underwater archaeologist. According to Steve Koski, 

“One thing that all the articles I read on Eugenie did not mention was her years of diving at Warm Mineral Springs and Little Salt Spring with the late Col. Bill Royal, who made some of the first archeological and paleontological discoveries at the spring beginning in 1958 and 1959. She heard of the blind tarpon and WMS Spring and wanted to investigate, met Bill Royal, and the two helped bring the finds to the scientific community with the first publication on WMS in American Antiquity (1960): “Natural Preservation of Human Brain, Warm Mineral Springs, Florida.” 

Steve who is the president of the Warm Mineral Springs/Little Salt Springs Archaeological Society and

who has dove and researched the springs as well, will share the interview and this other side of Dr. Clark's activities in North Port in the 1950s.

NOTE: This special evening follows Ted Ehmann's presentation on three incredible Florida women on January 10th, which also honors the world-famous marine biologist Eugenie Clark. 



ORDER YOUR COPY

The people of the great circle: PREHISTORIC mound builders in south florida

Think you know about the Calusa? Think again. Now a book that is written for the general reader about an ancient civilization that lived around the Charlotte Harbor for 25 centuries.


Author and founder of the Charlotte Harbor Anthropological Society Ted Ehmann investigated the mound building societies in the Ohio and Mississippi River Valleys for twenty-five years before moving to Port Charlotte. Despite his extensive knowledge of these ancient people, he had heard never heard of mound builders far away in south Florida. Upon moving to Port Charlotte, he set out to find out what he could. What he discovered is the basis for his book. Written for the general reader, Ehmann tells the story of a highly evolved people who successfully adapted to southwestern Gulf coastal environment, Immigrants from Louisiana around 800 BC, the Calusa engaged with the people already settled here. The result was a highly expressive culture that built monumental shell mound complexes, canals and even entire islands. Ehmann also shares how the view of these people have been misunderstood by Florida researchers, and how their conclusions fail to capture what was really the most " important and significant hunter-gathering society in world history."


COMING SOON -  The  People of the Great Circle, Prehistoric Mound Builders In South Florida, December, 2019, Pineapple Press, a division of Rowman & Littlefield Publishing  ISBN 97816833405 22 Available through booksellers everywhere

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Welcome

ORDER YOUR COPY OF THIS IMPORTANT BOOK ON THE CALUSA

learn more

Learn more about the author and his histories of forgotten florida

HOME

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our MISSION

Educate the public and officials about the significance of the Calusa Indians and the prehistoric cultural resources in the Charlotte Harbor Region, as well as to sponsor:field trips, speakers, events and symposiums.


Foster and encourage ongoing research and publications while promoting public accessibility to historical sites and the published archaeological research.


Be a clearing house for local knowledge of the Calusa and the prehistory and history of the Charlotte Harbor Region.


Develop and make available ongoing educational materials for local schools and community organizations, while encouraging careers in anthropology.

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Who WE ARE

Charlotte County Anthropological Society, Inc. is a non-profit corporation dedicated to educating, the public and the officials about the significant role of the Calusa Indians and the Charlotte Harbor Region in the prehistory and archaeological history of Florida and North America. The region came into notoriety in 1895-1896 when American ethnographer Frank Hamilton Cushing unearthed the first Calusa sites and treasures. Since the mid-twentieth century, interest in this epoch has decreased, leaving a vast number of sites not researched and questions unanswered. Intensive development of the region since the 1980s has further threatened the integrity of the remaining prehistoric resources.


Our membership is composed of professionals and non-professionals who wish to preserve the numerous rich prehistoric cultural sites and resources of the harbor region from the ravishes of exploitation and inadequate public policy and time


We are dedicated to sharing the rich ancient history and history of the 14,000 years of human s living in the Charlotte Harbor area. our new HERITAGE TOURS OF OLD FLORIDA will help develop heritage tourism for our area, which in turn will help us to preserve the remaining archaeological and historic sites for future generations.

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SOCIETY OFFICERS

Ted Ehmann, President & Treasurer

Gene Dole, Vice President

Bill Straus, Secretary


Board of Directors

Kathy Gerace